ItalyOrganic & Biodynamic wine-growing

Certification bodies: AIAB. | AMAB. | Demeter Italia.

2018: In October 2018 Demeter Italia certified around 400 hectares (990 acres) of vineyards as Biodynamic, over half of which was controlled by members of the Orsogna co-op in Abruzzo. Other significant Biodynamic Italian wine producers were Alois Lageder (Alto Adige) with 40 hectares and Nuova Cappelletta (Piemonte) with around 35 hectares.

2017In December 2017 Demeter Italia certified around 300 hectares (741 acres) of vineyards as Biodynamic from around 70 producers, of which around 50 estate bottled and 20 consigned their grapes to co-operatives. Italy’s organic vineyard (which include Demeter’s 300ha) reached 70,791 hectares, with another 34,593ha in conversion making a total of 105,384 hectares. Of this, it is estimated around 2,000 hectares was given to table grapes. Sicily has Italy’s biggest organic vineyard with 36,000ha and Italy’s biggest wine grape region overall with with 106,564 hectares (which means 34% of Sicily’s vineyard is organic). I Numeri del Vino calculates that crossing data from ISTAT data on total vineyard surface areas with Sinab’s data on organic vineyards Calabria and Basilicata have the highest percentages or organic vine surface area at 50% each, followed by Marche and Sicily around at 35% with Tuscany at 24%. Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia in the north-east are at 5-6%. Piedmont is still at 8% with 3,300 ha of organic vineyard out of 42,000ha overall. In terms of overall shares of the national organic vineyard Sicily (34%) and Puglia (16%) account for half the national total, followed by Toscana (13%), Marche (5%) and Calabria and Veneto with 4% each. The rest of Italy combined has 24% of the national organic vineyard.

2016In 2016 Italy had 66,133 hectares (163,348 acres) of certified organic vines (2,000ha of which were table grapes) plus another 37,412 hectares (92,408 acres) in conversion making a total of 103,545 hectares (255,756 acres) overall. My calculation is that in 2016 over 11% of the Italian vineyard was certified organic or Biodynamic and another 4% was in conversion (making 17% overall). The leading Italian regions for organic wine-growing were Sicily (Sicilia), Calabria, and Tuscany (Toscana).

2015In 2015 Italy had 53,901 hectares (133,135 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 29,741 hectares (73,460 acres) in conversion making a total of 83,642 hectares (206,596 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics.This meant that 9% of the Italian vineyard was certified organic and another 4% was in conversion (ISTAT).

2014In 2014 Italy had 46,901 hectares (115,845 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 25,460 hectares (62,886 acres) in conversion making a total of 72,361 hectares (178,731 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics.

2013In 2013 Italy had 44,174 hectares (109,110 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 23,763 hectares (58,695 acres) in conversion making a total of 67,937 hectares (167,804 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics (‘Bio in chiffre’ September 2014, p10). This represented a rise of 18.5% on the previous year. The regional breakdown was was follows: Sicily 25,153 hectares (38% of the national total), Puglia 10,604 hectares (14%), Sardinia 1,269 hectares, Calabria 2,355 hectares, Tuscany 8,748 hectares (13% of the national total), Latium 1.519 hectares, Emilia Romagna 2,574 hectares, Marche 3,787 hectares, Basilicata 708 hectares, Piemonte 1,254 hectares, Campania 706 hectares, Umbria 740 hectares, Abruzzo 3,385 hectares, Lombardy 1,197 hectares, Veneto 2,405 hectares, Trentino-Alto Adige 477 hectares, Molise 291 hectares, Friuli Venezia Giulia 709 hectares, Liguria 37 hectares, and 19 hectares Valle d’Aosta.

2012In 2012 Italy had 36,937 hectares (91,235 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 20,410 hectares (50,412 acres) in conversion making a total of 57,347 hectares (141,647 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics.

2011: In 2011 Italy had 34,077 hectares (84,170 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 18,735 hectares (46,275 acres) in conversion making a total of 52,812 hectares (130,455 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics.

2010 According to ISTAT Italy had 652,000 ha of wine grapes in 2010 (Ian D’Agata, 2014, p.5). In 2010 Italy had 42,733 hectares (80,850 acres) of certified organic vines plus another 9,566 hectares (23,628 acres) in conversion making a total of 52,999 hectares (104,479 acres) overall according to SINAB, Italy’s office for agricultural statistics. This meant that 6.6% of the Italian vineyard was certified organic or Biodynamic.

2009: In 2009 Italy had 27,408ha of certified organic vines, plus 16,206ha in conversion making a total of 27,424 hectares.